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Category Archives: Los Angeles Review of Books

Los Angeles Review of Books: Dana Goodyear

I talk to to journalist and poet Dana Goodyear who, as a staff writer for the New Yorker, has profiled such subjects as Japanese cellphone novels, filmmaker James Cameron, Los Angeles restaurant critic Jonathan Gold, and “Two-Buck Chuck”, the budget wine at Trader Joe’s. Her latest book is Anything That Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a […]

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: Michelle Huneven

I talk with Michelle Huneven, author of Round Rock, Jamesland, and Blame. In her latest novel Off Course, set in the early 1980s, a 28-year-old economics graduate student from Pasadena sequesters herself in dissertation-writing exile up in the Sierras — with no small amount of romantic intrigue. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s site, or download it on iTunes.

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: David Grand

I talk with David Grand, author of Louse, The Disappearing Body, and now Mount Terminus, a novel eleven years in the making whose mythic prose tells a story at the intersection of two births: the birth of cinema, and the birth of modern Los Angeles. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s site, or download it on iTunes.

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: Leslie Jamison

I talk with Leslie Jamison, author of the novel The Gin Closet and the new essay collection The Empathy Exams, which features pieces on her experiences acting out disease symptoms for medical students to diagnose, watching the Paradise Lost documentaries, assembling a “grand unified theory of female pain,” and getting mugged in Nicaragua. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s site, or download it on iTunes.

The Consummate Writer of Place: Christopher Rand in Los Angeles, China, and Beyond, 1943-1968

“LOS ANGELES may be the ultimate city of our age.” So begins the 20th century’s most unjustly forgotten book on Los Angeles, written by one of its most unjustly forgotten writers of place. Christopher Rand’s Los Angeles: The Ultimate City appeared in 1967, published by Oxford University Press and built upon a trilogy of articles TheNew Yorker ran in […]

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: Mimi Pond

On the latest Los Angeles Review of Books podcast, I talk with comic artist Mimi Pond, author of a variety of books from The Valley Girl’s Guide to Life to the new Over Easy, a graphic novel based on her waitressing days in late-1970s Oakland. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s site, or download it on iTunes.

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: Sandra Tsing Loh

On the latest Los Angeles Review of Books podcast, I talk with Sandra Tsing Loh, author of books of Southern California satire like Depth Takes a Holiday, If You Lived Here, You’d Be Home By Now, and A Year in Van Nuys, and now the memoir The Madwoman in the Volvo: My Year of Raging Hormones. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s […]

Outsider: Donald Richie in Japan, 1947-2013

PITY THE WESTERN JAPANOPHILE who longs to become Japanese. He either takes on every trapping he can manage of what he imagines as the Japanese existence, going as native as possible and in the process turning into a grotesque, or, having collided with one too many of the invisible barriers honeycombing his adopted homeland, throws […]

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: Winter 2014 Quarterly Journal special

The latest Los Angeles Review of Books podcast, a special on the second issue of their quarterly print journal, features a conversation between me and The Lost Art of Walking author Geoff Nicholson about his piece on travel writing without traveling and a reading by Colin Dickey from his piece on the arctic. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s site, […]

Los Angeles Review of Books Podcast: Attica Locke

On the latest Los Angeles Review of Books podcast I have a conversation with Attica Locke, author of Black Water Rising and The Cutting Season, thrillers set in 1981 Houston and a modern-day Louisiana plantation in which converge various charged threads of American history and society. You can listen to the conversation on the LARB’s site, or download it on iTunes.